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Annotated Bibliography

Carr, C.A. & Gordon, C.M.  (2012). Dirigo International.  HBS No. 9-212-056.  Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing. 

Dirigio International is an HBS case study on a fictitious story but a very realistic set of circumstances that is a common scenario in real life.  The case study describes a situation where a company, Dirigo, was attempting to expand its physical footprint by building a development in an underutilized area of the town, Kezar.  The study explores the position that Kezar’s Mayor is put in by having to determine the best path for the city-to allow Dirigo to develop or not. Thus far in my life, I have yet to be involved in any real estate dealings involving new buildings, only buildings that are currently existing, but as professor Morris mentioned in his video, it is highly likely that almost every company will intersect with property law.  The case, specifically the exhibits, highlighted general areas of concern in the planning and zoning processes, creating a benchmark for necessary considerations in a real life process similar to the one outlined in the Dirigo International case. I have lived in multiple gentrifying neighborhoods and it is easy to be a part of the gentrification without being educated on the impact. This case study created awareness around issues to consider including education, workforce development along with the overall impact of the potential development.  

LO2:  demonstrate the ability to assess complex organizational environments and achieve communicative goals.  

LO3:  address complex challenges by collaboratively leading teams across disciplines, distances, and sectors.  

Keywords:  Development, Real estate, zoning, community, property

Coutu, D.  (2009, May).  Why teams don’t work.  Harvard Business Review, 99-105.  Retrieved from https://hbr.org. 

This article was very impactful because the author’s thesis goes against so much of what we as individuals are taught by our institutions, our jobs and our parents, that teamwork and being a team player is important for success.  However, being on a team does not automatically equate with success. A good team has to be built and has to continue to be maintained, which is difficult to do the larger a team gets. Teams have to be well defined both in construct and in direction and the members need to each understand his/her place on the team as well as have support in the organization outside the immediate team.  It is also suggested that teams need coaching as a group, not as individuals, in order to thrive. Having a credible source, a leading organizational psychologist, in a very credible publication, state the fact that getting teams to work well together is hard, is incredibly refreshing and important. As a manger and someone who is managed, I need to have the realistic expectation that teams are not automatically effective at solving problems.  

Keywords:  teams, organization, success 

LO2:  demonstrate the ability to assess complex organizational environments and achieve communicative goals.

LO3:  address complex challenges by collaboratively leading teams across disciplines, distances, and sectors.